Women

30 Oct

Interconception

For many women, there is a delay in finding out that they are pregnant. Therefore, we encourage and promote that all women take care of their health and seek regular healthcare.

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30 Oct

Infections and Pregnancy.Pregnancy and New Moms CE

Infections and Pregnancy

Pregnancy is a vital stage for the development and growth of your baby. It is a time of many bodily changes and a time when a woman’s body can be more subject to infections. Certain infections during pregnancy can be a health risk for the pregnant woman and her unborn baby. For instance, they may cause miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, premature labor, low birth weight, stillbirth, birth defects and a newborn with the infection. Many of these infections are preventable with immunizations and treatable. The infections that may potentially cause harm during pregnancy include:

  • Rubella (German measles)
  • Chicken pox
  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Hepatitis B
  • Polio
  • Group B Streptococcus
  • Toxoplasmosis
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs):
    • HIV
    • Chlamydia
    • Gonorrhea
    • Genital Herpes
    • Syphilis
    •  

To protect your health and that of your baby it is important to be well informed and to seek the necessary care and medical attention to monitor and protect your pregnancy, which is what prenatal (during pregnancy) care aims to do. Preconception (before pregnancy) health care complements prenatal care by helping women and their partners to plan for and ensure a safe and successful pregnancy, birth and newborn. Both preconception and prenatal care help to identify potential risks and problems that can harm the woman and the unborn baby, and they attempt to mitigate them.

The Lower Hudson Valley Perinatal Network urges you to become more aware of infections during pregnancy because they can pose a danger to your health and the health and development of you unborn baby, and seek clinical advice during the preconception stage and medical care during the prenatal stage.

For more information on prenatal infections visit:

 Additional Tips:

STIs/STDs & Perinatal Health

Sexually transmitted infections/diseases (STIs/STDs) include over 25 infections that can be passed from person-to-person during sexual relations; during vaginal, anal and oral sex. It is important to find out if you and your partner are infected with any of these infections before becoming pregnant because when left untreated these infections can create serious risks to the pregnancy and the newborn.

Some key facts to note are:

  • There are an estimated 19 million new cases of STIs/STDs each year in the U.S.;
  • 1 in 4 people in the U.S. has an STI/STD; 
  • Many people do not present signs and/or symptoms of an STI; 
  • You cannot look at someone and know they have an STI/STD; 
  • You can be infected with one STI or more than one STI and not know it.

Therefore, consult your medical provider and find out if you have one or more than one STI or not. 

Anyone considering pregnancy should be completely informed about their health including knowing if they are infected with an STI.STIs/STDs, untreated, may lead to problems that affect the pregnant woman and/or her baby.

Potential Effects of STIs/STDs on Pregnancy and the Newborn:

  • Infertility (being unable to have children)
  • Miscarriage (spontaneous loss of the baby during pregnancy)
  • Ectopic pregnancy (development of baby outside the uterus, usually in the Fallopian tubes)
  • Premature labor (delivery before 37 weeks of pregnancy), causing low birthweight
  • Passage of the STI from mother to the baby before, during and after childbirth
  • Birth defects in the newborn
  • Serious eye infections, meningitis and pneumonia may occur in the infant

What to do if you suspect you have an STI/STD:

Some STIs/STDs can be cured (the infectious organism is killed such as with chlamydia and gonorrhea) and others can only be treated (the symptoms are managed but the infectious agent remains in the body such as with HIV and herpes).  It is important that you visit your medical provider before and during pregnancy to be tested for STIs/STDs and get treatment if you are infected.  Treatment is vital for you and your future baby.

Remember that even when you are pregnant you can contract STIs/STDs, so it is necessary to receive prenatal care and make sure you are tested for STIs/STDs during your pregnancy.  You may be tested early in your pregnancy and then again when you are closer to your delivery date.  Not all medical providers routinely check/test for STIs/STDs so it is recommended to mention to your medical provider that you want to be tested for STIs. 

Do not forget that if you test positive for a STI/STD and receive treatment, your partner also should be tested and treated.

Lower your risk of getting an STI/STD by
doing A, B, or C:

  • Abstinence (not having sex);
  • Being faithful (limiting your sexual partners) to one person that is STD-free;
  • Condom (use) a latex condom correctly (the right way) and consistently (every time you have sex).

For more information or help (in English), please contact: 
CDC - 1-800-CDC-INFO; NYS - 1-800-541-AIDS.
*******
Para más información o ayuda (en español), contacte a:
los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades
1-800-CDC-INFO; 
el Estado de Nueva York, Línea Telefónica de Salud
1-800-233-SIDA.

For more information, visit:

Recursos en Español:

Infections and Pregnancy

Pregnancy is a vital stage for the development and growth of your baby. It is a time of many bodily changes and a time when a woman’s body can be more subject to infections. Certain infections during pregnancy can be a health risk for the pregnant woman and her unborn baby. For instance, they may cause miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, premature labor, low birth weight, stillbirth, birth defects and a newborn with the infection. Many of these infections are preventable with immunizations and treatable. The infections that may potentially cause harm during pregnancy include:

  • Rubella (German measles)
  • Chicken pox
  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Hepatitis B
  • Polio
  • Group B Streptococcus
  • Toxoplasmosis
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs):
    • HIV
    • Chlamydia
    • Gonorrhea
    • Genital Herpes
    • Syphilis
    •  

To protect your health and that of your baby it is important to be well informed and to seek the necessary care and medical attention to monitor and protect your pregnancy, which is what prenatal (during pregnancy) care aims to do. Preconception (before pregnancy) health care complements prenatal care by helping women and their partners to plan for and ensure a safe and successful pregnancy, birth and newborn. Both preconception and prenatal care help to identify potential risks and problems that can harm the woman and the unborn baby, and they attempt to mitigate them.

The Lower Hudson Valley Perinatal Network urges you to become more aware of infections during pregnancy because they can pose a danger to your health and the health and development of you unborn baby, and seek clinical advice during the preconception stage and medical care during the prenatal stage.

For more information on prenatal infections visit:

 Additional Tips:

STIs/STDs & Perinatal Health

Sexually transmitted infections/diseases (STIs/STDs) include over 25 infections that can be passed from person-to-person during sexual relations; during vaginal, anal and oral sex. It is important to find out if you and your partner are infected with any of these infections before becoming pregnant because when left untreated these infections can create serious risks to the pregnancy and the newborn.

Some key facts to note are:

  • There are an estimated 19 million new cases of STIs/STDs each year in the U.S.;
  • 1 in 4 people in the U.S. has an STI/STD; 
  • Many people do not present signs and/or symptoms of an STI; 
  • You cannot look at someone and know they have an STI/STD; 
  • You can be infected with one STI or more than one STI and not know it.

Therefore, consult your medical provider and find out if you have one or more than one STI or not. 

Anyone considering pregnancy should be completely informed about their health including knowing if they are infected with an STI.STIs/STDs, untreated, may lead to problems that affect the pregnant woman and/or her baby.

Potential Effects of STIs/STDs on Pregnancy and the Newborn:

  • Infertility (being unable to have children)
  • Miscarriage (spontaneous loss of the baby during pregnancy)
  • Ectopic pregnancy (development of baby outside the uterus, usually in the Fallopian tubes)
  • Premature labor (delivery before 37 weeks of pregnancy), causing low birthweight
  • Passage of the STI from mother to the baby before, during and after childbirth
  • Birth defects in the newborn
  • Serious eye infections, meningitis and pneumonia may occur in the infant

What to do if you suspect you have an STI/STD:

Some STIs/STDs can be cured (the infectious organism is killed such as with chlamydia and gonorrhea) and others can only be treated (the symptoms are managed but the infectious agent remains in the body such as with HIV and herpes).  It is important that you visit your medical provider before and during pregnancy to be tested for STIs/STDs and get treatment if you are infected.  Treatment is vital for you and your future baby.

Remember that even when you are pregnant you can contract STIs/STDs, so it is necessary to receive prenatal care and make sure you are tested for STIs/STDs during your pregnancy.  You may be tested early in your pregnancy and then again when you are closer to your delivery date.  Not all medical providers routinely check/test for STIs/STDs so it is recommended to mention to your medical provider that you want to be tested for STIs. 

Do not forget that if you test positive for a STI/STD and receive treatment, your partner also should be tested and treated.

Lower your risk of getting an STI/STD by
doing A, B, or C:

  • Abstinence (not having sex);
  • Being faithful (limiting your sexual partners) to one person that is STD-free;
  • Condom (use) a latex condom correctly (the right way) and consistently (every time you have sex).

For more information or help (in English), please contact: 
CDC - 1-800-CDC-INFO; NYS - 1-800-541-AIDS.
*******
Para más información o ayuda (en español), contacte a:
los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades
1-800-CDC-INFO; 
el Estado de Nueva York, Línea Telefónica de Salud
1-800-233-SIDA.

For more information, visit:

Recursos en Español:

Infections and Pregnancy

Pregnancy is a vital stage for the development and growth of your baby. It is a time of many bodily changes and a time when a woman’s body can be more subject to infections. Certain infections during pregnancy can be a health risk for the pregnant woman and her unborn baby. For instance, they may cause miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, premature labor, low birth weight, stillbirth, birth defects and a newborn with the infection. Many of these infections are preventable with immunizations and treatable. The infections that may potentially cause harm during pregnancy include:

  • Rubella (German measles)
  • Chicken pox
  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Hepatitis B
  • Polio
  • Group B Streptococcus
  • Toxoplasmosis
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs):
    • HIV
    • Chlamydia
    • Gonorrhea
    • Genital Herpes
    • Syphilis
    •  

To protect your health and that of your baby it is important to be well informed and to seek the necessary care and medical attention to monitor and protect your pregnancy, which is what prenatal (during pregnancy) care aims to do. Preconception (before pregnancy) health care complements prenatal care by helping women and their partners to plan for and ensure a safe and successful pregnancy, birth and newborn. Both preconception and prenatal care help to identify potential risks and problems that can harm the woman and the unborn baby, and they attempt to mitigate them.

The Lower Hudson Valley Perinatal Network urges you to become more aware of infections during pregnancy because they can pose a danger to your health and the health and development of you unborn baby, and seek clinical advice during the preconception stage and medical care during the prenatal stage.

For more information on prenatal infections visit:

 Additional Tips:

STIs/STDs & Perinatal Health

Sexually transmitted infections/diseases (STIs/STDs) include over 25 infections that can be passed from person-to-person during sexual relations; during vaginal, anal and oral sex. It is important to find out if you and your partner are infected with any of these infections before becoming pregnant because when left untreated these infections can create serious risks to the pregnancy and the newborn.

Some key facts to note are:

  • There are an estimated 19 million new cases of STIs/STDs each year in the U.S.;
  • 1 in 4 people in the U.S. has an STI/STD; 
  • Many people do not present signs and/or symptoms of an STI; 
  • You cannot look at someone and know they have an STI/STD; 
  • You can be infected with one STI or more than one STI and not know it.

Therefore, consult your medical provider and find out if you have one or more than one STI or not. 

Anyone considering pregnancy should be completely informed about their health including knowing if they are infected with an STI.STIs/STDs, untreated, may lead to problems that affect the pregnant woman and/or her baby.

Potential Effects of STIs/STDs on Pregnancy and the Newborn:

  • Infertility (being unable to have children)
  • Miscarriage (spontaneous loss of the baby during pregnancy)
  • Ectopic pregnancy (development of baby outside the uterus, usually in the Fallopian tubes)
  • Premature labor (delivery before 37 weeks of pregnancy), causing low birthweight
  • Passage of the STI from mother to the baby before, during and after childbirth
  • Birth defects in the newborn
  • Serious eye infections, meningitis and pneumonia may occur in the infant

What to do if you suspect you have an STI/STD:

Some STIs/STDs can be cured (the infectious organism is killed such as with chlamydia and gonorrhea) and others can only be treated (the symptoms are managed but the infectious agent remains in the body such as with HIV and herpes).  It is important that you visit your medical provider before and during pregnancy to be tested for STIs/STDs and get treatment if you are infected.  Treatment is vital for you and your future baby.

Remember that even when you are pregnant you can contract STIs/STDs, so it is necessary to receive prenatal care and make sure you are tested for STIs/STDs during your pregnancy.  You may be tested early in your pregnancy and then again when you are closer to your delivery date.  Not all medical providers routinely check/test for STIs/STDs so it is recommended to mention to your medical provider that you want to be tested for STIs. 

Do not forget that if you test positive for a STI/STD and receive treatment, your partner also should be tested and treated.

Lower your risk of getting an STI/STD by
doing A, B, or C:

  • Abstinence (not having sex);
  • Being faithful (limiting your sexual partners) to one person that is STD-free;
  • Condom (use) a latex condom correctly (the right way) and consistently (every time you have sex).

For more information or help (in English), please contact: 
CDC - 1-800-CDC-INFO; NYS - 1-800-541-AIDS.
*******
Para más información o ayuda (en español), contacte a:
los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades
1-800-CDC-INFO; 
el Estado de Nueva York, Línea Telefónica de Salud
1-800-233-SIDA.

For more information, visit:

Recursos en Español:

The Human Papilloma Virus or HPV, as you may have heard it called, is the most commonly transmitted disease in the United States. It is spread through sexual contact. Many people do not know that they have the virus, but some people do have symptoms. There are several forms of the vaccine, most of which go away on their own. But in some cases it can cause of cervical and several other cancers, as well as genital warts. Learn more about HPV by visiting the CDC Webpage. The good news is that it can be prevented with vaccination and screening for cervical cancer. When detected early, problems that developed as a result of HPV can be treated. Read more about how HPV can be treated.

https://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/treatment.htm

The most important thing to remember is that HPV is preventable! Below are resources about the HPV vaccination

Do you have questions about HPV or about the HPV vaccine? Get them answered here.

  • Know the Facts! Read more about the vaccine.
  • There are two HPV Vaccines. Get the facts about both Gardasil and Ceravix
    • Learn about Gardasil, the HPV vaccine here.
    • Read more about Cervarix here
  • Get your questions answered! Here are some Frequently Asked Questions about the Vaccine.

Resources for Parents:

Information for 18 to 26 year olds

https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/stds-hiv-safer-sex/hpv/how-can-i-make-sure-i-dont-get-or-spread-hpv

Are you a provider looking for more information?

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30 Oct

Education.Nutrition CE

Nutrition

March is National Nutrition Month!

Celebrate by finding your healthy eating style and maintaining it for a lifetime!

  • Eat more whole grains!
    • Make half your grains whole grains! Choose grains such as brown rice or oats.
  • Aim for five servings of fruits and vegetables
    • Start strong! Make a smoothie with bananas, blueberries and Greek yogurt! That's about two servings.
  • Taste your food before you add salt!
    • Try to eat fresh fruits and vegetables when possible, they are naturally low in sodium
  • Choose healthy fats, such as olive oil, nuts or avocados.

Strive to make healthier choices in 2016

  • Set family meal times 
    • Plan regular family dinners, let the kids help prepare the meal.
  • Drink more water
    • Aim to drink 8 glasses of water a day! Try bringing a water bottle to work.
  • Make healthy snacks!
    • Combine foods from different food groups for an ideal snack. Try apples and peanut butter or cheese with whole grain crackers!
  • Get active!
    • Adults should be active for 30 minutes daily.

Looking for more information about how to eat healthy?

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/healthdisp/pdf/tipsheets/Use-Herbs-and-Spices-Instead-of-Salt.pdf

Tip sheets on this webpage were created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. For more information on National Nutrition Month or the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics please visit www.eatright.org.

Read More
30 Oct

Education.Health and Wellness.Teens CE

Teens

This is an exciting time in your life...and one where you are faced with lots of choices. YOU can choose what kind of person you want to be. Having a plan can help you to become that person and to make healthy decisions. Do you want to start planning your life now?

Find Out What Unhealthy Relationships Look Like?

Want to...

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30 Oct

Newborns

Newborn Screening Program

Department of Health Wadsworth Center

Congratulations on your new addition! The Newborn Screening Program, a service of the New York State Department of Health, is proud to be a part of this important time in your life. Our brochure, For Your Baby's Health, explains the Program and the screening process. The brochure is provided to every mother upon delivery in the hospital, be sure to get one. You may download an edition of the brochure in your primary language below:

 For Your Baby's Health Brochure

https://www.wadsworth.org/programs/newborn/screening/families

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30 Oct

Education Page

The LHVPN is committed to fulfilling its vision that "Every pregnancy is healthy and wanted and all women and families receive the support and services they need in a respectful environment."  We have provided a list of important websites and resources for you to utilize in your own life or for your clients/patients.

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Women